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Move a Face

Ann Belle Rosenberg put her grandson in this million dollar sports car.

Ann Belle was in Paris.

He was in Bryn Mawr.

Fun!

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Ann Belle Rosenberg

Is this the right tutorial for you?

The face you want to move could be in two situations.

Two Situations

Situation #1

You have two photographs of the same group of people.

The photographs were taken moments apart from each other.

Grandpa Gumpo has a great expression in one of the photographs.

In the other photograph, Grandpa Gumpo looks like a bee has just stung him.

You want to cover Grandpa Gumpo's bee-stung-face with his good-smile face.

To do the above, go to File > New > Photomerge Group Shot.

Don't use Photomerge Faces.

That's for combining facial features to make a funny face.

Situation #2

This tutorial is for the following situation.

You have a photograph of a group of people.

You want to add a person to the group that wasn't in the group.

Moving the face is easy.

Integrating it into the group photograph is complicated.

If you're an intermediate user of Photoshop Elements, stick around.

Beginners should come back later!

1 - Open the Two Photographs

Let's say you have a photograph of Uncle Fud.

And, you have a photograph of a group of people, the destination for Uncle Fud's face.

1) Open the photograph of Uncle Fud and the photograph of the group.

2 - Select Uncle Fud

2) Double click on the thumbnail of the Uncle Fud photograph in the project bin/photo bin at the bottom of your screen.

3) Select Uncle Fud's face and upper body.

Hair can be difficult to select.

You can select a few pixels of the background around Uncle Fud's hair.

Later, if necessary, erase these pixels of the background.

3 - Copy Uncle Fud

4) Press Ctrl + j.

Uncle Fud is now on a new layer all by himself.

5) Rename this layer as Uncle Fud.

4 - Do You Need to

Flip Uncle Fud?

You may need to rotate the Uncle Fud layer horizontally, left-to-right.

Do this if the lighting is different for Uncle Fud and for the group.

Check Uncle Fud's

Light Direction

Look at the lighting on Uncle Fud.

Figure out where the light is coming from.

Look at the shadows and highlights.

Let's say the light is coming from the left side in the Uncle Fud photograph.

Check the Group's

Light Direction

Next, look at the group photograph.

Is the light coming from the same direction as in the Uncle Fud photograph?

Let's say the light is coming from the right side in the group photograph.

When you put Uncle Fud into the group, he may look odd.

He's lighted from the left.

Everyone else is lighted from the right.

Back & Front Lighting

If one photograph has light was coming from behind—and the other photograph has light from the direction of the camera—there would be no need to flip Uncle Fud.

5 - Flip Uncle Fud

Do the following, if necessary.

6) Make sure the Uncle Fud layer is active (highlighted).

7) Go to Image > Rotate > Flip Layer Horizontally.

Make sure you select—Flip Layer Horizontally—not—Flip Horizontally.

Uncle Fud has flipped.

A person may look different when he or she is flipped left-to-right.

However, correcting the difference in lighting probably outweighs any unnaturalness due to the flipping.

This is even more true when the face is small in the group photograph.

6 - Move the Uncle Fud Layer

To move the Uncle Fud layer to the group photograph, do the following.

8) Make sure the Uncle Fud layer is active (highlighted).

9) Press Ctrl + a.

You'll see the marching ants on the edge of the image.

10) Select the Move tool.

11) Click, and hold, on the large image of Uncle Fud in the center of your screen.

Don't click on the Uncle Fud layer in the Layers panel on the right side.

So, you've clicked on Uncle Fud in the center of your screen, and you're holding the mouse button down.

12) Drag Uncle Fud onto the thumbnail of the group photograph in the photo projects bin at the bottom of your screen.

13) Double click the thumbnail of the group photograph in the project bin/photo bin.

The Uncle Fud layer is now on the top of the layer stack in the Layers panel on the right side of your screen.

If you haven't already done so, go to Move a Layer.

Uncle Fud

Background copy (Group of people)

Background

Layer Stack in the Photograph of the Group

Note:

Edit the Group Photograph, Now

You have moved the Uncle Fud layer to the group photograph.

You're finished with the Uncle Fud photograph.

From now on, you'll be editing the group photograph only.

7 - Reposition Uncle Fud

14) In the group photograph layer stack, make sure the Uncle Fud layer is active (highlighted).

15) Select the Move tool

16) Click, hold, and drag Uncle Fud.

You can reduce the opacity of the layer to better see how to integrate Uncle Fud into the group.

Fine tune the position by using the arrow keys on your keyboard.

You'll probably have to resize Uncle Fud.

His head may be too small or too big.

8 - Grid

You can use a grid to make it easier to resize Uncle Fud.

17) Go to View > Grid.

18) Use the Zoom tool to enlarge the face of the person in the group nearest to Uncle Fud.

Let's say Aunt Joan is next to Uncle Fud.

19) Count the number of boxes from the top of Aunt Joan's face to the bottom of her face.

Note: Grid Box Size

If the grid boxes are too small or too big, change their size.

Go to Grid in Preferences.

Windows

Edit > Preferences > Grid, or press Ctrl + k.

Mac

Photoshop Elements > Preferences > Grid.

9 - Resize Uncle Fud

Let's say the height of Aunt Joan's face is eleven boxes.

Uncle Fud will be "standing" behind Aunt Joan.

So, make his face a little smaller than eleven boxes.

20) Make sure the Uncle Fud layer is active (highlighted).

21) You may want to deselect the eye icons of the other layers, so you can see Uncle Fud more easily.

22) Go to Image > Transform > Free Transform, or press Ctrl + t.

A box will appear around Uncle Fud.

23) Position the cursor directly over the bottom right corner of the box.

The cursor will change to a straight double arrow (not curved).

Press and hold Alt, click and hold the mouse button down, and move the corner of the box to resize Uncle Fud.

Pressing and holding Alt keeps the aspect ratio of the Uncle Fud layer intact.

Again, make his face a little smaller than eleven boxes high.

24) Click the green check mark to keep the transformation.

If you haven't already done so, go to the Free Transform Tool.

25) Go to View > Grid to hide the grid.

26) Reselect the eye icons for the other layers.

Note:

Don't Degrade Uncle Fud

If you make a mistake when resizing Uncle Fud, it's best to go back to just before you resized the layer.

The Free Transform tool adds and deletes pixels.

Therefore, if you resize and click the green check mark, and do it again, and again, the Uncle Fud layer will degrade.

Use one of the following methods to backtrack.

Undo Arrow

So, if you don't like the new size of Uncle Fud, click the blue undo arrow icon until you return to the operation you did just before using the Free Transform tool.

Undo History

Go to Window > Undo History.

There, select the operation done just before using the Free Transform tool.

Then, close the Undo History window.

You'll go back to just before you used the Free Transform tool.

Note:

Tucking Uncle Fud into the Group

Uncle Fud's body isn't tucked into the group yet.

He's floating above the group!

He doesn't have legs!

Not to worry.

We'll tuck him into the group after correcting his Levels and color.

10 - Levels

27) If the exposure and contrast of the Uncle Fud layer are different from the group, do the following.

a) Make sure the Uncle Fud layer is active (highlighted).

b) Create a Levels adjustment layer.

Don't make any corrections yet.

c) Make sure the Levels adjustment layer is active (highlighted).

d) Press Ctrl + g (PSE 15: Ctrl + Alt + g) to group the Levels adjustment layer with the Uncle Fud layer.

Because they're grouped, the correction from the Levels adjustment layer will be confined only to the Uncle Fud layer.

The Levels adjustment layer won't affect the group.

If you haven't already done so, go to How to Group.

e) Return to the Levels window.

f) Make your Levels corrections to match the exposure and contrast of Uncle Fud with that of the group.

g) Click OK.

The layer stack will look like this.

↓ Levels

Uncle Fud

Background copy (Group of people)

Background

Note:

What about Doing

Levels for the Group?

You used Levels on the Uncle Fud layer.

When we're almost finished, you'll do Levels on all of the layers to make the entire photograph look its best.

11 - Color Correct Uncle Fud

The color of the light that illuminated Uncle Fud, in his original photograph, may have been a different color than the color of the light on the group.

People won't notice slight variations in the color between Uncle Fud and the rest of the group.

So, you don't need to match the color perfectly.

28) If the colors of Uncle Fud and the group are substantially different, try one of the following two color correction methods.

Automated Method

Correct Uncle Fud's Color

a) Make sure the Uncle Fud layer is active (highlighted).

b) Go to Enhance > Adjust Color > Adjust Color for Skin Tone.

c) Click on Uncle Fud's cheek.

Sliders

Use the sliders to fine tune the color.

The Tan and Blush sliders affect the skin tone.

Is Uncle Fud more tan, or more blush?

The Temperature slider can be used to cool (blue) or warm (red) the color.

Better?

Does Uncle Fud's color match the group better?

If not, correct the skin tones in the group.

Do the following.

Correct the Group's Color

d) Make sure the Background copy layer is active (highlighted).

e) Go to Enhance > Adjust Color > Adjust Color for Skin Tone.

f) Click on Aunt Joan's cheek.

But, don't click on her too-thick rouge.

You have now color corrected both layers.

Their color should be similar now.

Photo Filter Adjustment Layer Method

If you're somewhat skilled at judging color, use a Photo Filter adjustment layer.

a) Make sure the Uncle Fud layer is active (highlighted).

b) Create a Photo Filter adjustment layer.

Don't make any corrections yet.

To Group or Not to Group

Do you have a Levels adjustment layer already grouped with the Uncle Fud layer?

If so, you don't need to group the Photo Filter adjustment layer with the Uncle Fud layer.

The Photo Filter adjustment layer will be automatically grouped with the Levels adjustment layer.

So, skip ahead to f), below.

If you don't have a Levels adjustment layer grouped with the Uncle Fud layer, do the following.

d) Make sure the Photo Filter adjustment layer is active (highlighted).

e) Press Ctrl + g (PSE 15: Ctrl + Alt + g) to group the Levels adjustment layer with the Uncle Fud layer.

Again, because they're grouped, the correction from the Photo Filter adjustment layer will be confined only to the Uncle Fud layer.

The Photo Filter adjustment layer won't affect the group.

f) Use the Photo Filter adjustment layer.

g) Click the tiny black triangle to open the filter menu.

h) Select the filter according to the chart below.

The boldfaced filters are the most commonly used.

If Uncle Fud Is . . .

Use this Filter

Too cool (blue).

Warming Filter (81)

Too warm (red).

Cooling Filter (82)

Too cyan (blue/green)

Red

Too violet.

Orange

Too blue.

Yellow

Too magenta (pink).

Green

Too red.

Cyan

Too yellow.

Blue

Too orange

Violet

Too green, such as florescent lighting.

Magenta

If the color correction needs to be tweaked, return to the Photo Filter adjustment layer window, and move the Density slider back-and-forth.

The layer stack may look like this.

↓ Levels (Grouped with Uncle Fud)

↓ Photo Filter (Grouped with Uncle Fud)

Uncle Fud

Background copy (Group of people)

Background

12 - Tuck Uncle Fud into the Group

Do the following to blend Uncle Fud into the group.

Preparation

29) Make sure the Uncle Fud layer is active (highlighted).

30) Reduce the opacity of the Uncle Fud layer.

You need to be able to see the shoulders of Aunt Joan and others.

Understand What Needs to be Selected

Let's say Aunt Joan is standing next to Aunt Bea.

Uncle Fud is going to be between, and behind, the shoulders of the two aunts.

So, you need to select from their shoulders down.

Select

You'll select the two aunt's shoulders, and the upper parts of the their dresses.

The Magnetic Lasso tool may be the best selection tool for this task.

31) Make sure the Background copy layer is active (highlighted).

32) Deselect the eye icon for the Uncle Fud layer.

You don't want to select Uncle Fud.

You only want the aunt's shoulders and the tops of their dresses.

33) Select the shoulders of Aunt Joan and Aunt Bea, and continue the selection down on portions of their dresses.

34) Save the selection.

If you haven't already done so, go to Save the Selection.

Enter Aunts as the selection's name, and click OK.

Copy the Selected Area

Onto a New Layer

35) Make sure the Background copy layer is active (highlighted).

36) The eye icon for the Uncle Fud layer should still be deselected.

37) Press Ctrl + j.

The shoulders and dresses are now on a new layer.

38) Rename the layer as Shoulders & Dresses.

The Shoulders & Dresses Layer

Should Be in Register

The Shoulders & Dresses layer should be in register with the Background copy layer.

That is, the shoulders and dresses of the two aunts on both layers should "line up".

If for some reason, the Shoulders & Dresses layer is askew, from the Background copy layer, do the following.

a) Select the Shoulders & Dresses layer (highlighted).

b) Select the Move tool.

c) Move the Shoulders & Dresses layer using the arrow keys on your keyboard.

Drag the Layer to the Top

39) Click and hold on the Shoulders & Dresses layer, and drag it to the top of the layers stack.

This how the stack of layers should look.

Shoulders & Dresses

↓ Levels (Grouped with Uncle Fud)

↓ Photo Filter (Grouped with Uncle Fud)

Uncle Fud

Background copy (Group of people)

Background

40) Select the eye icon for the Uncle Fud layer so you can see him once again.

41) If the opacity for the Uncle Fud layer is still below 100%, move it back up to 100%.

What Happened

The Shoulders & Dresses layer is covering up the part of Uncle Fud that's "behind" the two aunts.

13 - Erase Uncle Fud's Beer Belly

An unneeded portion of Uncle Fud may be visible on the photograph.

This part is visible if the Shoulders & Dresses layer doesn't go down far enough to cover up the lower portion of Uncle Fud.

Let's say you can see the plunging necklines of Aunt Joan and Aunt Bea.

But, there's a portion of a hounds-tooth sport coat, with a beer belly sticking out, on the aunt's dresses.

Do the following.

42) Make sure the Uncle Fud layer is active (highlighted).

43) Select the Erase tool.

44) Click and drag on Uncle Fud's sport coat and beer belly.

14 - Check His Hair

Above, it was suggested that you select some of the background around Uncle Fud's hair.

If the background shows, erase it.

Do the following.

45) Make sure the Uncle Fud layer is active (highlighted).

46) Use the Zoom tool to enlarge Uncle Fud's head.

47) Select the Erase tool, and use a small brush.

48) Click and drag on any background around Uncle Fud's hair that shouldn't be there.

15 - Levels

Now is when you do Levels on the group.

49) Make sure the Shoulders & Dresses layer is active (highlighted).

50) Create a Levels adjustment layer.

Make the corrections.

Levels

Shoulders & Dresses

↓ Levels (Grouped with Uncle Fud)

↓ Photo Filter (Grouped with Uncle Fud)

Uncle Fud

Background copy (Group of people)

Background