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Borders

There are many ways you can add a border to a photograph.

Border Color

The color of the border will be either the foreground color or the background, depending on the method used.

If you haven't already, go to Foreground & Background Colors.

You can change the color of the foreground and background colors by using:

• The Color Picker.

Color Swatches.

A color from the photograph or from elsewhere.

Narrow Line

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A black line was added to the edge of the above photograph.

If you want a narrow line on the edge of the photograph, do the following.

1) Select the foreground color.

2) You have a Background layer and a Background copy layer.

Background copy

Background

3) Make sure the Background copy layer is active (highlighted).

Background copy

Background

4) Create a blank layer.

Layer 1

Background copy

Background

5) Press Ctrl + a.

The entire photograph is selected.

6) Go to Edit > Stroke.

The Stroke window opens.

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7) Enter the width of the stroke (line).

8) In the Location section, select:

• Inside.

9) In the Blending section, the:

• Mode should be Normal.

• Opacity should be 100%.

10) Click OK.

The stroke (line) is placed on Layer 1.

11) Press the Esc key (upper left on your keyboard) to delete the selection.

You can make the line translucent, if desired, by lowering the opacity of Layer 1.

The Opacity box is at the top of the layers stack, to the right of the Blending Mode box.

It probably has 100% inside.

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Two Narrow Lines

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A wide dark-blue line was added to the above photograph.

A narrow light-blue line was added inside the first line.

If you want two narrow lines, do the above steps.

Then, do the following.

1) Select a different foreground color from the first line.

2) Make sure the Layer 1 layer is active (highlighted).

Layer 1

Background copy

Background

3) Create a blank layer.

Layer 2
Layer 1

Background copy

Background

4) Click and drag the Quick Selection tool inside the first line.

The area inside the first line is selected.

5) Go to Edit > Stroke.

6) In the Stroke window, make the width smaller than the first line's width.

7) Click OK.

The new stroke (line) is placed on Layer 2.

8) Press the Esc key (upper left on your keyboard) to delete the selection.

Enlarge the Canvas

The canvas is hidden underneath your photograph.

If you make the canvas bigger than the photograph, it sticks out.

The extended canvas creates a border.

1) Go to Image > Resize > Canvas Size.

The Canvas Size window will open.

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2) Increase the width and height.

When Relative is not selected, you'll see the width and height of the photograph.

Increase these values by the size of the borders.

Enter: Size of photograph + border size

If you select Relative, the width and height boxes are zeroed.

Enter the values for the borders alone.

Enter: Border sizes

3) Open the Canvas extension color menu at the bottom of the window.

4) Select the source for the canvas (border) color.

If you click Other, the Color Picker will open.

5) Click OK.

Uneven Borders

What if you want the bottom border to be thicker than the top border?

Do the following.

6) Go to Image > Resize > Canvas Size.

7) Increase the height.

8) Click the top arrow on the Anchor icon in the middle of the Canvas Size window.

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The icon will change, showing the direction of the resizing.

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9) Click OK.

Use the Crop Tool

The above method probably works better than this one, but have a look.

Do the following.

1) Select the background color.

2) Use the Zoom tool to reduce the size of your photograph in the work area.

You need to have empty gray space around the photograph.

3)3) Select the Crop tool.

4) In options bar/Tool Options for the Crop tool, open the Show Crop Preset Options menu.

5) Select Use Photo Ratio.

The shape of the crop box will have the same aspect ratio of the photograph.

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6) Click, hold, and drag out a crop box on the photograph.

The size of the crop box doesn't matter.

7) Click, hold, and drag one of the corner handles of the crop box.

Make the crop box bigger than the photograph.

8) Click and hold on the crop box, and position it around the photograph.

You can also move the crop box by pressing the arrow keys on your keyboard.

The crop box will move faster if you press and hold the Shift key while using the arrow keys.

A grid on the photograph, or guides, may make positioning easier.

9) Click the green check mark.

Use the Cookie Cutter Tool

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The Cookie Cutter tool has many shapes.

Let's say you're using the heart shape.

You drag out the heart shape on your photograph.

The result is a heart-shaped photograph.

The layer below, here a pink layer, is revealed.

The pink layer becomes the border around the heart-shaped photograph.

1) You have a Background layer and a Background copy layer.

Background copy

Background

2) Make sure the Background copy layer is active (highlighted).

Background copy

Background

3) Create a blank layer.

Layer 1

Background copy

Background

4) Select the foreground color.

5) Select the Paint Bucket tool.

6) Click on your photograph.

The Layer 1 layer is filled with the foreground color.

7) Click and hold on Layer 1, and drag it between the Background layer and Background copy layer.

Background copy

Layer 1

Background

8) Make sure the Background copy layer is active (highlighted).

Background copy

Layer 1

Background

9) Select the Cookie Cutter tool.

10) In options bar/Tool Options for the Cookie Cutter tool:

• Select a shape.

• Feather the edge of the shape if desired.

11) Click, hold, and drag out the shape on your photograph.

12) Click the green check mark.

The photograph outside of the shape is removed, revealing the colored Layer 1 below.

Variation

You could also use a second photograph as the border.

See the next method.

Border Made from a Second Photograph

Let's say you have a photograph of the matriarch of your family—Delores.

You also have a photograph of Delores' favorite flowers—violets.

You can make the violets into a border around Delores.

1) You have a Background layer and a Background copy layer of Delores.

Background copy (Delores)

Background (Delores)

2) Make sure the Background copy layer is active (highlighted).

Background copy (Delores)

Background (Delores)

3) Go to File > Place.

The Place window will open.

4) Navigate to the photograph of the violets that you want to use as the border.

Size of the Second Photograph

It's easier to use a photograph that's the same size as the first photograph.

If it's a different size, use the Move tool to resize.

Do the following after step #6 below.

a) Select the Move tool.

b) Click and hold one of the box handles on the corners, and drag.

c) Click the green check mark.

Back to Work

5) Click Place.

6) Click the green check mark.

The violet photograph will appear in the layer stack.

Violets

Background copy (Delores)

Background (Delores)

7) Click and hold on the Violets layer, and drag it between the Background layer and Background copy layer.

Background copy (Delores)

Violets

Background (Delores)

8) Make sure the Background copy (Delores) layer is active (highlighted).

Background copy (Delores)

DSC_1234

Background

9) Use one of the methods below to cut a hole in the Background copy layer, revealing the second photograph below.

Method #1 - Cookie Cutter Tool

Use the Cookie Cutter tool, described above, to cut an opening in the Background copy layer.

Before doing so, make sure the Background copy layer is active (highlighted).

Method #2 - Marquee Selection Tools

Use the Elliptical Marquee tool to make an oval or circle.

Or, use the Rectangular Marquee tool to make a rectangle or square.

Do the following.

a) Make sure the Background copy layer is active (highlighted).

b) Drag out a selection.

There are selection tips below.

c) Go to Select > Inverse.

The area around the original selection is now selected.

d) Press Ctrl + x to cut a hole in the Background copy layer.

Selection Tips

• To make a circle or square, press and hold Shift, and drag out the selection.

• To feather the selection, go to Select > Feather.

• To move a selection, use the arrow keys on your keyboard.

The selection will move faster if you press and hold the Shift key while using the arrow keys.

• A grid on the photograph, or guides, may make positioning easier.

• To see the size of the selection, go to Window > Info.

Drag out the selection as you watch the size in the Info window.

• If the selection is the wrong size, go to Select > Transform Selection.

Click and hold on a handle on the side of the box, and drag.

Click the green check mark.

• To delete a selection, press the Esc key (upper left on your keyboard).

Method #3 - Shape Tool

You can use the Shape tool to create a selection.

a) Select the Shape tool.

b) In options bar/Tool Options for the Shape tool, select a shape.

We'll use the Rounded Rectangle shape.

c) In options bar/Tool Options:

• Set the Radius value to determine the roundness of the corners.

• Select an option in the Set Geometry Options menu.

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Unconstrained

Unconstrained allows you to drag out any size shape.

Square

Yup.

Fixed Size

If you select Fixed Size, you can enter size values in the width and height boxes.

Proportional

Proportional permits you to use an aspect ratio.

For most digital SLR cameras, the aspect ratio is 3:2.

For many point-and-shoot cameras, the ratio is 4:3.

Enter the aspect ratio in the width and height boxes.

You can now drag out a shape.

The shape can be any size, but it will have the chosen aspect ratio.

Back to Work

d) Click, hold, and drag out the shape on your photograph.

A grid on the photograph, or guides, may make sizing and positioning the shape easier.

To see the size of the shape, go to Window > Info.

Drag out the shape as you watch the size in the Info window.

e) Select the Magic Wand tool.

f) Click inside the shape.

g) You'll be prompted to simplify the layer—click OK.

The shape is selected.

h) Delete the shape layer.

i) Go to Select > Inverse.

The area outside the original selection is now selected.

j) To feather the selection, if desired, go to Select > Feather.

k) Make sure the Background copy layer is active (highlighted).

l) Press Ctrl + x to cut a hole in the Background copy layer.

Frame Templates

Photoshop Elements has many frame templates.

1) Go to Window > Content (Photoshop Elements 10 or earlier) or Window > Graphics (Photoshop Elements 11 or later).

2) In the upper-right corner, select:

• By Type in the first menu.

• Frames in the second menu.

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3) Double click on a frame thumbnail.

You have to be on the Internet.

The frame opens in the work area.

4) To return to the layers stack, go to Window > Layers.

Or, in Photoshop Elements 11 and later, click the Layers icon at the bottom right.