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Photo 3 Exhibit (Summer 2017)

Dave Brucker

Florida Scenes

In the past, photography has been an on and off hobby with minimal structure and organization. The vast majority of my photographs fall into two categories. One is time oriented, consisting of family photos over the years which provide a photographic record of family holidays and visits, kids and grandkids growing up and family members as they age. The other is event oriented, which pictorially records places I have been and things I have seen during periods of extensive travel.

Currently, I am beginning to embrace photography as an art by being more creative and innovative, not just in taking photographs but also in editing them and looking for unique common threads that tie scenes together. I strive for my photographs to have a “wow” factor.

Dave Brucker

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Joanne Eframian

The Beauty of Curves

I am an educator with an enthusiasm to share the beauty of the world around us. I am an evolving artist using the media of acrylics, oils, pastels, and digital photography for keeping memories alive.

Photography is a branch of art that I have long wanted to develop and explore. There is such an abundance of beauty in this world that I feel driven to capture it for the pleasure of reliving the moment. I am in awe of God's "paintbrush" in sunsets, clouds, symmetry in nature, and the countenance of people and animals. I am also in awe of Man's creativity.

I am on a journey striving to creatively capture the essence of beauty whether of a grand panoramic view or of an intricate detail.

Joanne Eframian

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Susan Foreman

A Day at the Ranch

Constantly shoot, to catch the moment that will never return. The camera must be on my person and ready to go at all times. Creativity is partly being in the flow and mostly being prepared to be in the flow. The instrument has to be tuned. I am the conduit for the creative energy that flows in the cosmos through me, resulting in the image.

You have to always be looking to find the essence of the familiar scene and see it in a new way. It's on two levels, the physical, and the spiritual.

I don't get tired of seeing my horses. I try to see them differently every day. The familiar subject presents the challenge of waiting for the Opportunity. That is the best photograph. The one that you haven't taken before, of the subject you've seen a hundred times.

The elusive moment captured by the camera for examination. You can stand in front of the image as long as you like to explore your reaction, to connect with the subject, to see how I see. You can slow down, stop even. Photography gives the photographer and the viewer a moment to just be together.

Susan Foreman

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Mic Jessogne

Geometry in Nature

I believe that photography can not only capture the essence of a moment not to be forgotten but also create a stirring in the viewer's (and the photographer's) soul which will make one seek a deeper meaning to this life.

Mic Jessogne

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Ann Klemeyer

Interiors

Photography to me is taking advantage of and capturing a moment in place and time, using the world as my canvas.

 Whether I create it, or stumble upon it, a photograph should have feeling and substance.

 I, as a photographer, hope to ignite the creative juices in the viewer. No matter if they interpret it as I took the photo, or in their own way.

Ann Klemeyer

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Paul B. Laub

Synesthesia

Fear is fundamental. My fear. Fear that my images will be summarily rejected for failing to conform to conventional standards of the "beautiful" or the "picturesque". Also, fear that I might over-respond by lapsing into cliché.

Though I cannot help desiring praise, perhaps I should not seek it. Instead I might aim to incite a visceral response. For example: "That sucks!" "Obscene!" Or, "Why in the world would anyone photograph a cigarette butt found on the street?" Better, I guess, to be condemned than to be ignored.

Seriously, one thing truly worth seeking is a strong intuition of what gives art quality. Sure I know — "skill, originality, relevance to one's time, yada, yada, yada" — but these are mere academic abstractions, not intuition unconsciously active and always available. I want intuition I can rely on. I want intuition allowing me to ignore the opinions of others. And, one way or another, I am going to find it.

Paul B. Laub

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Robert Rainer

Heart of Saturday Night

I came to photography and cameras later in life. I had always wanted to document our travels but I often felt a "good camera" was beyond my capacity. By using an older gifted Nikon camera six years ago, I began to explore the landscapes and points of interest on our European travels. Then editing the images in Lightroom. My goals now are to get the Technology correct i.e.: the Hardware (camera, lens etc.) and to use the Software packages to enhance what I have captured on the storage cards of my newest Nikon 7200 a significant step up in Hardware.

Robert Rainer

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Mary Richardson

Transportation:

The Art of Getting There

Without my glasses, I can't really see much more than 10 feet in front of me. And I hate wearing my glasses. But the camera helps me to see, to pay attention, and to notice details. Perhaps because my long-distance vision is faulty, I am drawn to strong graphic elements that are right in front of me, much more than to panoramic landscapes or delicate prettiness. Photography gives me the ability to organize and put a frame around things that seem important, so that I can keep them and so that others can see what I see.

Mary Richardson

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Isabelle Simon

In the Kitchen

When photographing I am hoping to create, not to just record an image of what already exists, but use what exists … Snap, I push the shutter release, capture it, and then crop and manipulate, trying to twist the reality of the image to reflect the feelings that it evoked in me; to see "its" elusive qualities, feel "its" essence, to hear unheard sounds.

Then excitement and pleasure if I am able to create an artistic expression from the image ….

Well, that’s my statement, at least for now … there are so many photographic avenues, and I would like to go down as many as I can.

I would like one day to be able to say, with confidence …

I am an artist and I express myself through photography.

Isabelle Simon

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Patricia TuccioGround Art

Photos & video are a part of my everyday life, but making "art" is not. Once in a while real life magic happens and a picture becomes a metaphor, a synthesis of thought & feeling, but only rarely, does a picture become art.

I enjoy experimenting with various kinds cameras, including the iPhone and the micro 4/3 camera, especially when using "legacy lenses", older glass lenses used with a dedicated adaptor & operated manually. The picture, "Ground Art, Ringling Museum" was an experiment with a new micro 4/3 camera. I usually prefer taking spontaneous "people" pictures, street shots, so an abstract, formless image taken along a shady path on the Ringling grounds, was personally an "outside the box" experience.

Nevertheless, it was a warm reminder of attending a weekend event for the surprising and adventuresome "RE-PURPOSED EXHIBITION", organized by Matthew McLendon, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at The Ringling, Feb.13 - May 17, 2015.

Patricia Tuccio

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"Ground Art, Ringling Museum", Patricia Tuccio 8.9.17